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Accounting Policies of State Bank of India Company

Mar 31, 2015

Schedule 1

Note No. 1.1 Changes in Accounting Policies - Depreciation Policy on Fixed Assets

During the year, the method of depreciation on Fixed Assets has been changed to straight line method (SLM) on the basis of useful life determined on technical evaluation, as against WDV method with Income Tax Rates being used hitherto. Consequent to the change, depreciation of prior period amounting to Rs. 741.77 crores has been found to be in excess and the depreciation charged for the year is higher by Rs. 125.66 crores. As a result the fixed assets and profit before tax are higher by Rs. 616.11 crores.

Note No. 1.1.1.1 Employee''s Pension Plans and gratuity Plans

During the year, SBI has aligned its policy with regard to valuation of plan assets from Book Value to Fair Value in accordance with Accounting Standard 15 issued by ICAI. As a result of the change, the value of plan assets has increased by Rs. 2,069.00 crores in respect of Pension Fund and by Rs. 113.87 crores in respect of Gratuity Fund.

Note No. 2 Sale of Assets to Reconstruction Companies

The shortfall on account of sale of assets to Reconstruction Companies amounting to Rs. 3,897.04 crores is being amortized over a period of two years, in terms of RBI Circular DBOD.BP.BC.No.98/21.04.132/2013-14 dated February 26, 2014. Consequently, Rs. 887.13 crores has been charged to the Profit & Loss Account for the year ended March 31, 2015. The amount unamortised as at March 31,2015 is Rs. 3,009.91 crores.

Note No. 3 Counter Cyclical Buffer

RBI vide Circular No. DBOD.No.BP.95/21.04.048/2013-14 dated February 7, 2014 on ''Utilisation of Floating Provisions/ Counter Cyclical Provisioning Buffer'' has allowed the banks, to utilise up to 33 per cent of Counter Cyclical Provisioning Buffer (CCPB) held by them as on March 31,2013, for making specific provisions for Non-Performing Assets (NPAs) as per the policy approved by the Bank''s Board of Directors. Accordingly, SBI has utilized the CCPB of Rs. 382 crores (Rs. 750 crores utilised in the FY 2013-14) for making specific provision for NPAs, in accordance with the board approved policy and approval of the Board.

Further, RBI vide Circular No. DBR.No.BP.BC.79/21.04.048/2014-15 dated March 30, 2015 on ''Utilisation of Floating Provisions/Counter Cyclical Provisioning Buffer'' has allowed the banks, to utilise up to 50 per cent of CCPB held by them as on December 31,2014, for making specific provisions for Non-Performing Assets (NPAs) as per the policy approved by the Bank''s Board of Directors. Accordingly, Domestic Banking Subsidiaries have utilized the CCPB of Rs. 79.19 crores for making specific provision for NPAs, in accordance with the board approved policy and approval of the Board.


Mar 31, 2013

1. Revenue recognition

1.1 Income and expenditure are accounted on accrual basis, except otherwise stated. In respect of banks foreign offices, income is recognised as per the local laws of the country in which the respective foreign office is located.

1.2 Interest income is recognised in the Profit and Loss Account as it accrues except (i) income from non- performing assets (NPAs), comprising of advances, leases and investments, which is recognised upon realisation, as per the prudential norms prescribed by the RBI/ respective country regulators in case of foreign offices (hereafter collectively referred to as Regulatory Authorities), (ii) overdue interest on investments and bills discounted, (iii) Income on Rupee Derivatives designated as "Trading".

1.3 Profit or loss on sale of investments is recognised in the Profit and Loss Account, however, the profit on sale of investments in the Held to Maturity category is appropriated net of applicable taxes and amount required to be transferred to statutory reserve to Capital Reserve Account.

1.4 Income from finance leases is calculated by applying the interest rate implicit in the lease to the net investment outstanding in the lease, over the primary lease period. Leases effective from April 1, 2001 are accounted as advances at an amount equal to the net investment in the lease. The lease rentals are apportioned between principal and finance income based on a pattern reflecting a constant periodic return on the net investment outstanding in respect of finance leases. The principal amount is utilized for reduction in balance of net investment in lease and finance income is reported as interest income.

1.5 Income (other than interest) on investments in "Held to Maturity" (HTM) category acquired at a discount to the face value, is recognised as follows:

a. On Interest bearing securities, it is recognised only at the time of sale/ redemption.

b. On zero-coupon securities, it is accounted for over the balance tenor of the security on a constant yield basis.

1.6 Dividend is accounted on an accrual basis where the right to receive the dividend is established.

1.7 All other commission and fee incomes are recognised on their realisation except for (i) Guarantee commission on deferred payment guarantees, which is spread over the period of the guarantee and (ii) Commission on Government Business, which is recognised as it accrues.

1.8 One time Insurance Premium paid under Special Home Loan Scheme (December 2008 to June 2009) is amortised over average loan period of 15 years.

2. Investments

The transactions in Government Securities are recorded on "Settlement Date". Investments other than Government Securities are recorded on "Trade Date".

2.1 Classification

Investments are classified into three categories, viz. Held to Maturity (HTM), Available for Sale (AFS) and Held for Trading (HFT).

2.2 Basis of classification:

i. Investments that the Bank intends to hold till maturity are classified as Held to Maturity.

ii. Investments that are held principally for resale within 90 days from the date of purchase are classified as Held for Trading.

iii. Investments, which are not classified in the above two categories, are classified as Available for Sale.

iv. An investment is classified as Held to Maturity, Available for Sale or Held for Trading at the time of its purchase and subsequent shifting amongst categories is done in conformity with regulatory guidelines.

v. Investments in subsidiaries, joint ventures and associates are classified as Held to Maturity.

2.3 Valuation:

i. In determining the acquisition cost of an investment:

(a) Brokerage/commission received on subscriptions is reduced from the cost.

(b) Brokerage, commission, securities transaction tax etc. paid in connection with acquisition of investments are expensed upfront and excluded from cost.

(c) Broken period interest paid / received on debt instruments is treated as interest expense/income and is excluded from cost/sale consideration.

(d) Cost is determined on the weighted average cost method for investments under AFS and HFT category and on FIFO basis (first in first out) for investments under HTM category.

ii. The transfer of a security amongst the above three categories is accounted for at the least of acquisition cost/book value/market value on the date of transfer, and the depreciation, if any, on such transfer is fully provided for.

iii. Treasury Bills and Commercial Papers are valued at carrying cost.

iv. Held to Maturity category: Investments under Held to Maturity category are carried at acquisition cost unless it is more than the face value, in which case the premium is amortised over the period remaining maturity on constant yield basis. Such amortisation of premium is adjusted against income under the head "interest on investments". Investments in subsidiaries, joint ventures and associates (both in India and abroad) are valued at historical cost except for investments in Regional Rural Banks, which are valued at carrying cost (i.e book value). A provision is made for diminution, other than temporary, for each investment individually.

v. Available for Sale and Held for Trading categories: Investments held under AFS and HFT categories are individually revalued at the market price or fair value determined as per Regulatory guidelines, and only the net depreciation of each group for each category is provided for and net appreciation, is ignored. On provision for depreciation, the book value of the individual securities remains unchanged after marking to market.

vi. Security receipts issued by an asset reconstruction company (ARC) are valued in accordance with the guidelines applicable to non-SLR instruments. Accordingly, in cases where the security receipts issued by the ARC are limited to the actual realisation of the financial assets assigned to the instruments in the concerned scheme, the Net Asset Value, obtained from the ARC, is reckoned for valuation of such investments.

vii. Investments are classified as performing and non-performing, based on the guidelines issued by the RBI in case of domestic offices and respective regulators in case of foreign offices. Investments of domestic offices become non-performing where:

(a) Interest/installment (including maturity proceeds) is due and remains unpaid for more than 90 days.

(b) In the case of equity shares, in the event the investment in the shares of any company is valued at Rs.1 per company on account of the non availability of the latest balance sheet, those equity shares would be reckoned as NPI.

(c) If any credit facility availed by the issuer is NPA in the books of the bank, investment in any of the securities issued by the same issuer would also be treated as NPI and vice versa.

(d) The above would apply mutatis- mutandis to preference shares where the fixed dividend is not paid.

(e) The investments in debentures/bonds, which are deemed to be in the nature of advance, are also subjected to NPI norms as applicable to investments.

(f) In respect of foreign offices, provisions for non performing investments are made as per the local regulations or as per the norms of RBI, whichever is higher.

viii. Accounting for Repo/ reverse repo transactions (other than transactions under the Liquidity Adjustment Facility (LAF) with the RBI)

(a) The securities sold and purchased under Repo/ Reverse repo are accounted as Collateralized lending and borrowing transactions. However securities are transferred as in case of normal outright sale/ purchase transactions and such movement of securities is reflected using the Repo/Reverse Repo Accounts and Contra entries. The above entries are reversed on the date of maturity. Costs and revenues are accounted as interest expenditure/ income, as the case may be. Balance in Repo A/c is classified under schedule 4 (Borrowings) and balance in Reverse Repo A/c is classified under schedule 7 (Balance with Banks and Money at Call & Short Notice).

(b) Securities purchased / sold under LAF with RBI are debited / credited to Investment Account and reversed on maturity of the transaction. Interest expended / earned thereon is accounted for as expenditure / revenue.

3. Loans /Advances and Provisions thereon

3.1 Loans and Advances are classified as performing and non-performing, based on the guidelines issued by RBI. Loan assets become non-performing assets (NPAs) where:

i. In respect of term loans, interest and/or instalment of principal remains overdue for a period of more than 90 days;

ii. In respect of Overdraft or Cash Credit advances, the account remains "out of order", i.e. if the outstanding balance exceeds the sanctioned limit/drawing power continuously for a period of 90 days, or if there are no credits continuously for 90 days as on the date of balance-sheet, or if the credits are not adequate to cover the interest due during the same period;

iii. In respect of bills purchased/discounted, the bill remains overdue for a period of more than 90 days;

iv. In respect of agricultural advances for short duration crops, where the instalment of principal or interest remains overdue for two crop seasons;

v. In respect of agricultural advances for long duration crops, where the principal or interest remains overdue for one crop season.

3.2 NPAs are classified into sub-standard, doubtful and loss assets, based on the following criteria stipulated by RBI:

i. Sub-standard: A loan asset that has remained non-performing for a period less than or equal to 12 months.

ii. Doubtful: A loan asset that has remained in the sub-standard category for a period of 12 months.

iii. Loss: A loan asset where loss has been identified but the amount has not been fully written off.

3.3 Provisions are made for NPAs as per the extant guidelines prescribed by the regulatory authorities, subject to minimum provisions as prescribed below:

Substandard Assets:

i. A general provision of 15%

ii. Additional provision of 10% for exposures which are unsecured ab-initio (i.e. where realisable value of security is not more than 10 percent ab- initio)

iii. Unsecured Exposure in respect of infrastructure loan accounts where certain safeguards such as escrow accounts are available - 20%

Doubtful Assets:

-Secured portion: i. Upto one year - 25%

ii. One to three years - 40%

iii. More than three years - 100%

-Unsecured portion 100%

Loss Assets: 100%

3.4 In respect of foreign offices, classification of loans and advances and provisions for non performing advances are made as per the local regulations or as per the norms of RBI, whichever is more stringent.

3.5 The sale of NPAs is accounted as per guidelines prescribed by RBI. If the sale is at a price below net book value, the shortfall is debited to the profit and loss account, and in case of sale for a value higher than net book value, the excess provision is retained and utilised to meet the shortfall / loss on sale of other financial assets. Net book value is outstandings as reduced by specific provisions held and ECGC claims received.

3.6 Advances are net of specific loan loss provisions, unrealised interest, ECGC claims received and bills rediscounted.

3.7 For restructured/rescheduled assets, provisions are made in accordance with the guidelines issued by RBI, which require that the difference between the fair value of the loan before and after restructuring is provided for, in addition to provision for NPAs. The provision for diminution in fair value and interest sacrifice, arising out of the above, is reduced from advances.

3.8 In the case of loan accounts classified as NPAs, an account may be reclassified as a performing asset if it conforms to the guidelines prescribed by the regulators.

3.9 Amounts recovered against debts written off in earlier years are recognised as revenue.

3.10 In addition to the specific provision on NPAs, general provisions are also made for standard assets These provisions are reflected in Schedule 5 of the balance sheet under the head "Other Liabilities & Provisions - Others" and are not considered for arriving at Net NPAs.

4. Floating Provisions

The bank has a policy for creation and utilisation of floating provisions separately for advances, investments and general purpose. The quantum of floating provisions to be created is assessed at the end of each financial year. The floating provisions are utilised only for contingencies under extra ordinary circumstances specified in the policy with prior permission of Reserve Bank of India.

5. Provision for Country Exposure

In addition to the specific provisions held according to the asset classification status, provisions are held for individual country exposures (other than the home country). Countries are categorised into seven risk categories, namely, insignificant, low, moderate, high, very high, restricted and off-credit, and provisioning made as per extant RBI guidelines. If the country exposure (net) of the bank in respect of each country does not exceed 1% of the total funded assets, no provision is maintained on such country exposures. The provision is reflected in schedule 5 of the balance sheet under the "Other liabilities & Provisions - Others".

6. Derivatives:

6.1 The Bank enters into derivative contracts, such as foreign currency options, interest rate swaps, currency swaps, and cross currency interest rate swaps and forward rate agreements in order to hedge on-balance sheet/off-balance sheet assets and liabilities or for trading purposes. The swap contracts entered to hedge on-balance sheet assets and liabilities are structured in such a way that they bear an opposite and offsetting impact with the underlying on-balance sheet items. The impact of such derivative instruments is correlated with the movement of the underlying assets and accounted in accordance with the principles of hedge accounting.

6.2 Derivative contracts classified as hedge are recorded on accrual basis. Hedge contracts are not marked to market unless the underlying Assets / Liabilities are also marked to market.

6.3 Except as mentioned above, all other derivative contracts are marked to market as per the generally accepted practices prevalent in the industry. In respect of derivative contracts that are marked to market, changes in the market value are recognised in the profit and loss account in the period of change. Any receivable under derivatives contracts, which remain overdue for more than 90 days, are reversed through profit and loss account to "Suspense A/c Crystallised Receivables". In cases where the derivative contracts provide for more settlement in future and if the derivative contract is not terminated on the overdue receivables remaining unpaid for 90 days, the positive MTM pertaining to future receivables is also reversed from Profit and Loss Account to "Suspense A/c - Positive MTM".

6.4 Option premium paid or received is recorded in profit and loss account at the expiry of the option. The Balance in the premium received on options sold and premium paid on options bought have been considered to arrive at Mark to Market value for forex Over the Counter options.

6.5 Exchange Traded Derivatives entered into for trading purposes are valued at prevailing market rates based on rates given by the Exchange and the resultant gains and losses are recognized in the Profit and Loss Account.

7. Fixed Assets and Depreciation

7.1 Fixed assets are carried at cost less accumulated depreciation.

7.2 Cost includes cost of purchase and all expenditure such as site preparation, installation costs and professional fees incurred on the asset before it is put to use. Subsequent expenditure incurred on assets put to use is capitalised only when it increases the future benefits from such assets or their functioning capability.

7.3 The rates of depreciation and method of charging depreciation in respect of domestic operations are as under:

7.4 In respect of assets acquired during the year for domestic operations, depreciation is charged for half a year in respect of assets used for upto 180 days and for the full year in respect of assets used for more than 180 days, except depreciation on computers and software, which is charged for the full year irrespective of the period for which the asset was put to use.

7.5 Items costing less than Rs. 1,000 each are charged off in the year of purchase.

7.6 In respect of leasehold premises, the lease premium, if any, is amortised over the period of lease and the lease rent is charged in the respective year.

7.7 In respect of assets given on lease by the Bank on or before 31st March 2001, the value of the assets given on lease is disclosed as Leased Assets under fixed assets, and the difference between the annual lease charge (capital recovery) and the depreciation is taken to Lease Equalisation Account.

7.8 In respect of fixed assets held at foreign offices, depreciation is provided as per the regulations / norms of the respective countries.

8. Leases

The asset classification and provisioning norms applicable to advances, as laid down in Para 3 above, are applied to financial leases also.

9. Impairment of Assets

Fixed Assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances warrant that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Recoverability of assets to be held and used is measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset to future net discounted cash flows expected to be generated by the asset. If such assets are considered to be impaired, the impairment to be recognised is measured by the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the fair value of the asset.

10. Effect of changes in the foreign exchange rate

10.1 Foreign Currency Transactions

i. Foreign currency transactions are recorded on initial recognition in the reporting currency by applying to the foreign currency amount the exchange rate between the reporting currency and the foreign currency on the date of transaction.

ii. Foreign currency monetary items are reported using the Foreign Exchange Dealers Association of India (FEDAI) closing spot/forward rates.

iii. Foreign currency non-monetary items, which are carried in terms at historical cost, are reported using the exchange rate at the date of the transaction.

iv. Contingent liabilities denominated in foreign currency are reported using the FEDAI closing spot rates.

v. Outstanding foreign exchange spot and forward contracts held for trading are revalued at the exchange rates notified by FEDAI for specified maturities, and the resulting profit or loss is recognised in the Profit and Loss account.

vi. Foreign exchange forward contracts which are not intended for trading and are outstanding at the balance sheet date, are valued at the closing spot rate. The premium or discount arising at the inception of such a forward exchange contract is amortised as expense or income over the life of the contract.

vii. Exchange differences arising on the settlement of monetary items at rates different from those at which they were initially recorded are recognised as income or as expense in the period in which they arise.

viii. Gains / Losses on account of changes in exchange rates of open position in currency futures trades are settled with the exchange clearing house on daily basis and such gains / losses are recognised in the profit and loss account.

10.2 Foreign Operations

Foreign Branches of the Bank and Offshore Banking Units have been classified as Non-integral Operations and Representative Offices have been classified as Integral Operations.

a. Non-integral Operations:

i. Both monetary and non-monetary foreign currency assets and liabilities including contingent liabilities of non-integral foreign operations are translated at closing exchange rates notified by FEDAI at the balance sheet date.

ii. Income and expenditure of non-integral foreign operations are translated at quarterly average closing rates.

iii. Exchange differences arising on net investment in non-integral foreign operations are accumulated in Foreign Currency Translation Reserve until the disposal of the net investment.

iv. The Assets and Liabilities of foreign offices in foreign currency (other than local currency of the foreign offices) are translated into local currency using spot rates applicable to that country.

b. Integral Operations:

i. Foreign currency transactions are recorded on initial recognition in the reporting currency by applying to the foreign currency amount the exchange rate between the reporting currency and the foreign currency on the date of transaction.

ii. Monetary foreign currency assets and liabilities of integral foreign operations are translated at closing exchange rates notified by FEDAI at the balance sheet date and the resulting profit/loss is included in the profit and loss account.

iii. Foreign currency non-monetary items which are carried in terms of historical cost are reported using the exchange rate at the date of the transaction.

11. Employee Benefits:

11.1 Short Term Employee Benefits:

The undiscounted amount of short-term employee benefits, such as medical benefits, casual leave etc. which are expected to be paid in exchange for the services rendered by employees are recognised during the period when the employee renders the service.

11.2 Post Employment Benefits:

i. Defined Benefit Plan

a. The Bank operates a Provident Fund scheme. All eligible employees are entitled to receive benefits under the Banks Provident Fund scheme. The Bank contributes monthly at a determined rate (currently 10% of employees basic pay plus eligible allowance). These contributions are remitted to a trust established for this purpose and are charged to Profit and Loss Account. The bank recognises such annual contributions as an expense in the year to which it relates. Shortfall if any is provided for on the basis of actuarial valuation.

b. The bank operates gratuity and pension schemes which are defined benefit plans.

i) The Bank provides for gratuity to all eligible employees. The benefit is in the form of lump sum payments to vested employees on retirement, on death while in employment, or on termination of employment, for an amount equivalent to 15 days basic salary payable for each completed year of service, subject to a maximum amount of Rs. 10 lacs. Vesting occurs upon completion of five years of service. The Bank makes periodic contributions to a fund administered by trustees based on an independent external actuarial valuation carried out annually.

ii) The Bank provides for pension to all eligible employees. The benefit is in the form of monthly payments as per rules and regular payments to vested employees on retirement, on death while in employment, or on termination of employment. Vesting occurs at different stages as per rules. The Bank makes monthly contribution to the pension fund at 10% of salary in terms of SBI Pension Fund Rules. The pension liability is reckoned based on an independent actuarial valuation carried out annually and Bank makes such additional contributions periodically to the Fund as may be required to secure payment of the benefits under the pension regulations.

c. The cost of providing defined benefits is determined using the projected unit credit method, with actuarial valuations being carried out at each balance sheet date. Actuarial gains/ losses are immediately recognised in the statement of profit and loss and are not deferred.

ii. Defined Contribution Plans

The bank operates a new pension scheme (NPS) for all officers/ employees joining the Bank on or after 1st August, 2010, which is a defined contribution plan, such new joinees not being entitled to become members of the existing SBI Pension Scheme. As per the scheme, the covered employees contribute 10% of their basic pay plus dearness allowance to the scheme together with a matching contribution from the Bank. Pending completion of registration procedures, these contributions are retained as deposits in the bank and earn interest at the same rate as that of the current account of Provident Fund balance. The bank recognises such annual contributions and interest as an expense in the year to which they relate. Upon receipt of the Permanent Retirement Account Number (PRAN), the consolidated contribution amounts are transferred to the NPS Trust.

iii. Other Long Term Employee benefits:

a. All eligible employees of the bank are eligible for compensated absences, silver jubilee award, leave travel concession, retirement award and resettlement allowance. The costs of such long term employee benefits are internally funded by the Bank.

b. The cost of providing other long term benefits is determined using the projected unit credit method with actuarial valuations being carried out at each balance sheet date. Past service cost is immediately recognised in the statement of profit and loss and is not deferred.

11.3 Employee benefits relating to employees employed at foreign offices are valued and accounted for as per the respective local laws/regulations.

12. Taxes on income

12.1 Income tax expense is the aggregate amount of current tax and deferred tax. Current taxes are determined in accordance with the provisions of Accounting Standard 22 and tax laws prevailing in India after taking into account taxes of foreign offices, which are based on the tax laws of respective jurisdiction. Deferred tax adjustments comprise of changes in the deferred tax assets or liabilities during the period.

12.2 Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using tax rates and tax laws that have been enacted or substantially enacted prior to the balance sheet date. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognised on a prudent basis for the future tax consequences of timing differences arising between the carrying values of assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases, and carry forward losses. The impact of changes in the deferred tax assets and liabilities is recognised in the profit and loss account.

12.3 Deferred tax assets are recognised and reassessed at each reporting date, based upon managements judgement as to whether realisation is considered reasonably certain. Deferred tax assets are recognised on carry forward of unabsorbed depreciation and tax losses only if there is virtual certainty that such deferred tax assets can be realised against future profits.

13. Earnings per Share

13.1 The Bank reports basic and diluted earnings per share in accordance with AS 20 -Earnings per Share issued by the ICAI. Basic earnings per share are computed by dividing the net profit after tax by the weighted average number of equity shares outstanding for the year.

13.2 Diluted earnings per share reflect the potential dilution that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue equity shares were exercised or converted during the year. Diluted earnings per share are computed using the weighted average number of equity shares and dilutive potential equity shares outstanding at year end.

14. Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets

14.1 In conformity with AS 29, "Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets", issued by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India, the Bank recognises provisions only when it has a present obligation as a result of a past event, it is probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation, and when a reliable estimate of the amount of the obligation can be made.

14.2 No provision is recognised for

i. any possible obligation that arises from past events and the existence of which will be confirmed only by the occurrence or non- occurrence of one or more uncertain future events not wholly within the control of the Bank; or

ii. any present obligation that arises from past events but is not recognised because

a. it is not probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation; or

b. a reliable estimate of the amount of obligation cannot be made.

Such obligations are recorded as Contingent Liabilities. These are assessed at regular intervals and only that part of the obligation for which an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits is probable, is provided for, except in the extremely rare circumstances where no reliable estimate can be made.

14.3 Contingent Assets are not recognised in the financial statements.

15. Special Reserves

Revenue and Other Reserves include Special Reserve created under Section 36 (i) (viii) of the Income Tax Act, 1961. The Board of Directors of the Bank has passed a resolution approving creation of the reserve and confirming that it has no intention to make withdrawal from the Special Reserve.

16. Share Issue Expenses

Share issue expenses are charged to the Share Premium Account.


Mar 31, 2012

A. Basis of Preparation

The Banks financial statements are prepared under the historical cost convention, on the accrual basis of accounting, unless otherwise stated and conform in all material aspects to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) in India, which comprise applicable statutory provisions, regulatory norms/guidelines prescribed by Reserve Bank of India (RBI), Accounting Standards issued by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India (ICAI), and the practices prevalent in the banking industry in India.

B. Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements requires the management to make estimates and assumptions considered in the reported amount of assets and liabilities (including contingent liabilities) as of the date of the financial statements and the reported income and expenses during the reporting period. Management believes that the estimates used in the preparation of the financial statements are prudent and reasonable. Future results could differ from these estimates.

C. Significant Accounting Policies

1. Revenue recognition

1.1 Income and expenditure are accounted on accrual basis, except otherwise stated. In respect of banks foreign offices, income is recognised as per the local laws of the country in which the respective foreign office is located.

1.2 Interest income is recognised in the Profit and Loss Account as it accrues except (i) income from non- performing assets (NPAs), comprising of advances, leases and investments, which is recognised upon realisation, as per the prudential norms prescribed by the RBI/ respective country regulators in case of foreign offices (hereafter collectively referred to as Regulatory Authorities), (ii) interest on application money on investments, (iii) overdue interest on investments and bills discounted, (iv) Income on Rupee Derivatives designated as "Trading".

1.3 Profit or loss on sale of investments is recognised in the Profit and Loss Account, however, the profit on sale of investments in the Held to Maturity category is appropriated net of applicable taxes and amount required to be transferred to statutory reserve to Capital Reserve Account.

1.4 Income from finance leases is calculated by applying the interest rate implicit in the lease to the net investment outstanding in the lease, over the primary lease period. Leases effective from April 1, 2001 are accounted as advances at an amount equal to the net investment in the lease. The lease rentals are apportioned between principal and finance income based on a pattern reflecting a constant periodic return on the net investment outstanding in respect of finance leases. The principal amount is utilized for reduction in balance of net investment in lease and finance income is reported as interest income.

1.5 Income (other than interest) on investments in "Held to Maturity" (HTM) category acquired at a discount to the face value, is recognised as follows :

a. On Interest bearing securities, it is recognised only at the time of sale/ redemption.

b. On zero-coupon securities, it is accounted for over the balance tenor of the security on a constant yield basis.

1.6 Dividend is accounted on an accrual basis where the right to receive the dividend is established.

1.7 All other commission and fee incomes are recognised on their realisation except for (i) Guarantee commission on deferred payment guarantees, which is spread over the period of the guarantee and (ii) Commission on Government Business, which is recognised as it accrues.

1.8 One time Insurance Premium paid under Special Home Loan Scheme (December 2008 to June 2009) is amortised over average loan period of 15 years.

2. Investments

The transactions in Government Securities are recorded on "Trade Date" up to 31.12.2010 and on "Settlement Date" with effect from 01.01.2011. Investments other than Government Securities are recorded on "Trade Date".

2.1 Classification

Investments are classified into three categories, viz. Held to Maturity (HTM), Available for Sale (AFS) and Held for Trading (HFT)

2.2 Basis of classification:

i. Investments that the Bank intends to hold till maturity are classified as Held to Maturity.

ii. Investments that are held principally for resale within 90 days from the date of purchase are classified as Held for Trading.

iii. Investments, which are not classified in the above two categories, are classified as Available for Sale.

iv. An investment is classified as Held to Maturity, Available for Sale or Held for Trading at the time of its purchase and subsequent shifting amongst categories is done in conformity with regulatory guidelines.

v. Investments in subsidiaries, joint ventures and associates are classified as Held to Maturity.

2.3 Valuation:

i. In determining the acquisition cost of an investment:

(a) Brokerage/commission received on subscriptions is reduced from the cost.

(b) Brokerage, commission, securities transaction tax etc. paid in connection with acquisition of investments are expensed upfront and excluded from cost.

(c) Broken period interest paid / received on debt instruments is treated as interest expense/income and is excluded from cost/ sale consideration.

(d) Cost is determined on the weighted average cost method for investments under AFS and HFT category and on FIFO basis (first in first out) for investments under HTM category.

ii. The transfer of a security amongst the above three categories is accounted for at the least of acquisition cost/book value/market value on the date of transfer, and the depreciation, if any, on such transfer is fully provided for.

iii. Treasury Bills and Commercial Papers are valued at carrying cost.

iv. Held to Maturity category: Investments under Held to Maturity category are carried at acquisition cost unless it is more than the face value, in which case the premium is amortised over the period remaining maturity on constant yield basis. Such amortisation of premium is adjusted against income under the head "interest on investments". Investments in subsidiaries, joint ventures and associates (both in India and abroad) are valued at historical cost except for investments in Regional Rural Banks, which are valued at carrying cost (i.e book value). A provision is made for diminution, other than temporary, for each investment individually.

v. Available for Sale and Held for Trading categories:

Investments held under AFS and HFT categories are individually revalued at the market price or fair value determined as per Regulatory guidelines, and only the net depreciation of each group for each category is provided for and net appreciation, is ignored. On provision for depreciation, the book value of the individual securities remains unchanged after marking to market.

vi. Security receipts issued by an asset reconstruction company (ARC) are valued in accordance with the guidelines applicable to non-SLR instruments. Accordingly, in cases where the security receipts issued by the ARC are limited to the actual realisation of the financial assets assigned to the instruments in the concerned scheme, the Net Asset Value, obtained from the ARC, is reckoned for valuation of such investments.

vii. Investments are classified as performing and non-performing, based on the guidelines issued by the RBI in case of domestic offices and respective regulators in case of foreign offices. Investments of domestic offices become non- performing where:

(a) Interest/installment (including maturity proceeds) is due and remains unpaid for more than 90 days.

(b) In the case of equity shares, in the event the investment in the shares of any company is valued at Rs1 per company on account of the non availability of the latest balance sheet, those equity shares would be reckoned as NPI.

(c) If any credit facility availed by the issuer is NPA in the books of the bank, investment in any of the securities issued by the same issuer would also be treated as NPI and vice versa.

(d) The above would apply mutatis-mutandis to preference shares where the fixed dividend is not paid.

(e) The investments in debentures/bonds, which are deemed to be in the nature of advance, are also subjected to NPI norms as applicable to investments.

(f) In respect of foreign offices, provisions for non performing investments are made as per the local regulations or as per the norms of RBI, whichever is higher.

viii. Accounting for Repo/ reverse repo transactions (other than transactions under the Liquidity Adjustment Facility (LAF) with the RBI)

(a) The securities sold and purchased under Repo/ Reverse repo are accounted as Collateralized lending and borrowing transactions. However securities are transferred as in case of normal outright sale/ purchase transactions and such movement of securities is reflected using the Repo/ Reverse Repo Accounts and Contra entries. The above entries are reversed on the date of maturity. Costs and revenues are accounted as interest expenditure/income, as the case may be. Balance in Repo A/c is classified under schedule 4 (Borrowings) and balance in Reverse Repo A/c is classified under schedule 7 (Balance with Banks and Money at Call & Short Notice).

(b) Securities purchased / sold under LAF with RBI are debited / credited to Investment Account and reversed on maturity of the transaction. Interest expended / earned thereon is accounted for as expenditure / revenue.

3. Loans / Advances and Provisions thereon

3.1 Loans and Advances are classified as performing and non-performing, based on the guidelines issued by RBI.

Loan assets become non-performing assets (NPAs) where:

i. In respect of term loans, interest and/or instalment of principal remains overdue for a period of more than 90 days;

ii. In respect of Overdraft or Cash Credit advances, the account remains "out of order", i.e. if the outstanding balance exceeds the sanctioned limit/drawing power continuously for a period of 90 days, or if there are no credits continuously for 90 days as on the date of balance-sheet, or if the credits are not adequate to cover the interest due during the same period;

iii. In respect of bills purchased/discounted, the bill remains overdue for a period of more than 90 days;

iv. In respect of agricultural advances for short duration crops, where the instalment of principal or interest remains overdue for two crop seasons;

v. In respect of agricultural advances for long duration crops, where the principal or interest remains overdue for one crop season.

3.2 NPAs are classified into sub-standard, doubtful and loss assets, based on the following criteria stipulated by RBI:

i. Sub-standard: A loan asset that has remained non-performing for a period less than or equal to 12 months.

ii. Doubtful: A loan asset that has remained in the sub-standard category for a period of 12 months.

iii. Loss: A loan asset where loss has been identified but the amount has not been fully written off.

3.3 Provisions are made for NPAs as per the extant guidelines prescribed by the regulatory authorities, subject to minimum provisions as prescribed below:

Sub-standard Assets:

i. A general provision of 15%

ii. Additional provision of 10% for exposures which are unsecured ab-initio (i.e. where realisable value of security is not more than 10 percent ab-initio)

iii. Unsecured Exposure in respect of infrastructure loan accounts where certain safeguards such as escrow accounts are available - 20%

Doubtful Assets:

- Secured portion: i. Upto one year - 25%

ii. One to three years - 40%

iii. More than three years - 100%

- Unsecured portion 100%

Loss Assets: 100%

3.4 In respect of foreign offices, classification of loans and advances and provisions for non performing advances are made as per the local regulations or as per the norms of RBI, whichever is more stringent.

3.5 The sale of NPAs is accounted as per guidelines prescribed by RBI. If the sale is at a price below net book value, the shortfall is debited to the profit and loss account, and in case of sale for a value higher than net book value, the excess provision is retained and utilised to meet the shortfall / loss on sale of other financial assets. Net book value is outstandings as reduced by specific provisions held and ECGC claims received.

3.6 Advances are net of specific loan loss provisions, unrealised interest, ECGC claims received and bills rediscounted.

3.7 For restructured/rescheduled assets, provisions are made in accordance with the guidelines issued by RBI, which require that the difference between the fair value of the loan before and after restructuring is provided for, in addition to provision for NPAs. The provision for diminution in fair value and interest sacrifice, arising out of the above, is reduced from advances.

3.8 In the case of loan accounts classified as NPAs, an account may be reclassified as a performing asset if it conforms to the guidelines prescribed by the regulators.

3.9 Amounts recovered against debts written off in earlier years are recognised as revenue.

3.10 In addition to the specific provision on NPAs, general provisions are also made for standard assets. These provisions are reflected in Schedule 5 of the balance sheet under the head "Other Liabilities & Provisions - Others" and are not considered for arriving at Net NPAs.

4. Floating Provisions

The bank has a policy for creation and utilisation of floating provisions separately for advances, investments and general purpose. The quantum of floating provisions to be created is assessed at the end of each financial year. The floating provisions are utilised only for contingencies under extra ordinary circumstances specified in the policy with prior permission of Reserve Bank of India.

5. Provision for Country Exposure

In addition to the specific provisions held according to the asset classification status, provisions are held for individual country exposures (other than the home country). Countries are categorised into seven risk categories namely, insignificant, low, moderate, high, very high, restricted and off-credit and provisioning made as per extant RBI guidelines. If the country exposure (net) of the bank in respect of each country does not exceed 1% of the total funded assets, no provision is maintained on such country exposures. The provision is reflected in schedule 5 of the balance sheet under the head "Other liabilities & Provisions - Others".

6. Derivatives:

6.1 The Bank enters into derivative contracts, such as foreign currency options, interest rate swaps, currency swaps, and cross currency interest rate swaps and forward rate agreements in order to hedge on-balance sheet/off-balance sheet assets and liabilities or for trading purposes. The swap contracts entered to hedge on-balance sheet assets and liabilities are structured in such a way that they bear an opposite and off setting impact with the underlying on-balance sheet items. The impact of such derivative instruments is correlated with the movement of the underlying assets and accounted in accordance with the principles of hedge accounting.

6.2 Derivative contracts classified as hedge are recorded on accrual basis. Hedge contracts are not marked to market unless the underlying Assets / Liabilities are also marked to market.

6.3 Except as mentioned above, all other derivative contracts are marked to market as per the generally accepted practices prevalent in the industry. In respect of derivative contracts that are marked to market, changes in the market value are recognised in the profit and loss account in the period of change. Any receivable under derivatives contracts, which remain overdue for more than 90 days, are reversed through profit and loss account to "Suspense A/c Crystallised Receivables". In cases where the derivative contracts provide for more settlement in future and if the derivative contract is not terminated on the overdue receivables remaining unpaid for 90 days, the positive MTM pertaining to future receivables is also reversed from Profit and Loss Account to "Suspense A/c - Positive MTM".

6.4 Option premium paid or received is recorded in profit and loss account at the expiry of the option. The Balance in the premium received on options sold and premium paid on options bought have been considered to arrive at Mark to Market value for forex Over the Counter options.

6.5 Exchange Traded Derivatives entered into for trading purposes are valued at prevailing market rates based on rates given by the Exchange and the resultant gains and losses are recognized in the Profit and Loss Account.

7. Fixed Assets and Depreciation

7.1 Fixed assets are carried at cost less accumulated depreciation.

7.2 Cost includes cost of purchase and all expenditure such as site preparation, installation costs and professional fees incurred on the asset before it is put to use. Subsequent expenditure incurred on assets put to use is capitalised only when it increases the future benefits from such assets or their functioning capability.

7.4 In respect of assets acquired during the year for domestic operations, depreciation is charged for half a year in respect of assets used for upto 180 days and for the full year in respect of assets used for more than 180 days, except depreciation on computers and software, which is charged for the full year irrespective of the period for which the asset was put to use.

7.5 Items costing less than Rs1,000 each are charged off in the year of purchase.

7.6 In respect of leasehold premises, the lease premium, if any, is amortised over the period of lease and the lease rent is charged in the respective year.

7.7 In respect of assets given on lease by the Bank on or before 31st March 2001, the value of the assets given on lease is disclosed as Leased Assets under fixed assets, and the difference between the annual lease charge (capital recovery) and the depreciation is taken to Lease Equalisation Account.

7.8 In respect of fixed assets held at foreign offices, depreciation is provided as per the regulations /norms of the respective countries.

8. Leases

The asset classification and provisioning norms applicable to advances, as laid down in Para 3 above, are applied to financial leases also.

9. Impairment of Assets

Fixed Assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances warrant that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Recoverability of assets to be held and used is measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset to future net discounted cash flows expected to be generated by the asset. If such assets are considered to be impaired, the impairment to be recognised is measured by the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the fair value of the asset.

10. Effect of changes in the foreign exchange rate

10.1 Foreign Currency Transactions

i. Foreign currency transactions are recorded on initial recognition in the reporting currency by applying to the foreign currency amount the exchange rate between the reporting currency and the foreign currency on the date of transaction.

ii. Foreign currency monetary items are reported using the Foreign Exchange Dealers Association of India (FEDAI) closing spot/forward rates.

iii. Foreign currency non-monetary items, which are carried in terms at historical cost, are reported using the exchange rate at the date of the transaction.

iv. Contingent liabilities denominated in foreign currency are reported using the FEDAI closing spot rates.

v. Outstanding foreign exchange spot and forward contracts held for trading are revalued at the exchange rates notified by FEDAI for specified maturities, and the resulting profit or loss is recognised in the Profit and Loss account.

vi. Foreign exchange forward contracts which are not intended for trading and are outstanding at the balance sheet date, are valued at the closing spot rate. The premium or discount arising at the inception of such a forward exchange contract is amortised as expense or income over the life of the contract.

vii. Exchange differences arising on the settlement of monetary items at rates different from those at which they were initially recorded are recognised as income or as expense in the period in which they arise.

viii. Gains / Losses on account of changes in exchange rates of open position in currency futures trades are settled with the exchange clearing house on daily basis and such gains / losses are recognised in the profit and loss account.

10.2 Foreign Operations

Foreign Branches of the Bank and Offshore Banking Units have been classified as Non-integral Operations and Representative Offices have been classified as Integral Operations.

a. Non-integral Operations:

i. Both monetary and non-monetary foreign currency assets and liabilities including contingent liabilities of non-integral foreign operations are translated at closing exchange rates notified by FEDAI at the balance sheet date.

ii. Income and expenditure of non-integral foreign operations are translated at quarterly average closing rates.

iii. Exchange differences arising on net investment in non-integral foreign operations are accumulated in Foreign Currency Translation Reserve until the disposal of the net investment.

iv. The Assets and Liabilities of foreign offices in foreign currency (other than local currency of the foreign offices) are translated into local currency using spot rates applicable to that country.

b. Integral Operations:

i. Foreign currency transactions are recorded on initial recognition in the reporting currency by applying to the foreign currency amount the exchange rate between the reporting currency and the foreign currency on the date of transaction.

ii. Monetary foreign currency assets and liabilities of integral foreign operations are translated at closing exchange rates notified by FEDAI at the balance sheet date and the resulting profit/loss is included in the profit and loss account.

iii. Foreign currency non-monetary items which are carried in terms of historical cost are reported using the exchange rate at the date of the transaction.

11. Employee Benefits:

11.1 Short Term Employee Benefits:

The undiscounted amount of short-term employee benefits, such as medical benefits, casual leave etc. which are expected to be paid in exchange for the services rendered by employees are recognised during the period when the employee renders the service.

11.2 Post Employment Benefits:

i. Defined Benefit Plan

a. The Bank operates a Provident Fund scheme. All eligible employees are entitled to receive benefits under the Banks Provident Fund scheme. The Bank contributes monthly at a determined rate (currently 10% of employees basic pay plus eligible allowance). These contributions are remitted to a trust established for this purpose and are charged to Profit and Loss Account. The bank recognises such annual contributions as an expense in the year to which it relates.

b. The bank operates gratuity and pension schemes which are defined benefit plans.

c. The Bank provides for gratuity to all eligible employees. The benefit is in the form of lump sum payments to vested employees on retirement, on death while in employment, or on termination of employment, for an amount equivalent to 15 days of basic salary payable for each completed year of service, subject to a maximum amount of Rs10 lacs. Vesting occurs upon completion of five years of service. The Bank makes annual contributions to a fund administered by trustees based on an independent external actuarial valuation carried out annually.

d. The Bank provides for pension to all eligible employees. The benefit is in the form of monthly payments as per rules and regular payments to vested employees on retirement, on death while in employment, or on termination of employment. Vesting occurs at different stages as per rules. The Bank makes annual contribution to the pension fund at 10% of salary in terms of SBI Pension Fund Rules. The pension liability is reckoned based on an independent actuarial valuation carried out annually and Bank makes such additional contributions to the Fund as may be required to secure payment of the benefits under the pension regulations.

e. The cost of providing defined benefits is determined using the projected unit credit method, with actuarial valuations being carried out at each balance sheet date. Actuarial gains/losses are immediately recognised in the statement of profit and loss and are not deferred.

ii. Defined Contribution Plans

The bank operates a new pension scheme (NPS) for all officers / employees joining the Bank on or after 1st August, 2010, which is a defined contribution plan, such new joinees not being entitled to become members of the existing SBI Pension Scheme. As per the scheme, the covered employees contribute 10% of their basic pay plus dearness allowance to the scheme together with a matching contribution from the Bank. Pending completion of registration procedures, these contributions are retained as deposits in the bank and earn interest at the same rate as that of the current account of Provident Fund balance. The bank recognises such annual contributions and interest as an expense in the year to which they relate.

iii. Other Long Term Employee benefits:

a. All eligible employees of the bank are eligible for compensated absences, silver jubilee award, leave travel concession, retirement award and resettlement allowance. The costs of such long term employee benefits are internally funded by the Bank.

b. The cost of providing other long term benefits is determined using the projected unit credit method with actuarial valuations being carried out at each balance sheet date. Past service cost is immediately recognised in the statement of profit and loss and is not deferred.

11.3 Employee benefits relating to employees employed at foreign offices are valued and accounted for as per the respective local laws/regulations.

12. Taxes on income

12.1 Income tax expense is the aggregate amount of current tax and deferred tax. Current taxes are determined in accordance with the provisions of Accounting Standard 22 and tax laws prevailing in India after taking into account taxes of foreign offices, which are based on the tax laws of respective jurisdiction. Deferred tax adjustments comprise of changes in the deferred tax assets or liabilities during the period.

12.2 Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using tax rates and tax laws that have been enacted or substantially enacted prior to the balance sheet date. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognised on a prudent basis for the future tax consequences of timing differences arising between the carrying values of assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases, and carry forward losses. The impact of changes in the deferred tax assets and liabilities is recognised in the profit and loss account.

12.3 Deferred tax assets are recognised and reassessed at each reporting date, based upon managements judgement as to whether realisation is considered reasonably certain. Deferred tax assets are recognised on carry forward of unabsorbed depreciation and tax losses only if there is virtual certainty that such deferred tax assets can be realised against future profits.

13. Earnings per Share

13.1 The Bank reports basic and diluted earnings per share in accordance with AS 20 -Earnings per Share issued by the ICAI. Basic earnings per share are computed by dividing the net profit after tax by the weighted average number of equity shares outstanding for the year.

13.2 Diluted earnings per share reflect the potential dilution that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue equity shares were exercised or converted during the year. Diluted earnings per share are computed using the weighted average number of equity shares and dilutive potential equity shares outstanding at year end.

14. Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets

14.1 In conformity with AS 29, "Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets", issued by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India, the Bank recognises provisions only when it has a present obligation as a result of a past event, it is probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation, and when a reliable estimate of the amount of the obligation can be made.

14.2 No provision is recognised for

i. any possible obligation that arises from past events and the existence of which will be confirmed only by the occurrence or non-occurrence of one or more uncertain future events not wholly within the control of the Bank; or

ii. any present obligation that arises from past events but is not recognised because

a. it is not probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation; or

b. a reliable estimate of the amount of obligation cannot be made.

Such obligations are recorded as Contingent Liabilities. These are assessed at regular intervals and only that part of the obligation for which an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits is probable, is provided for, except in the extremely rare circumstances where no reliable estimate can be made.

14.3 Contingent Assets are not recognised in the financial statements.

15. Special Reserves

Revenue and Other Reserves include Special Reserve created under Section 36 (1) (viii) of the Income Tax Act, 1961. The Board of Directors of the Bank has passed a resolution approving creation of the reserve and confirming that it has no intention to make withdrawal from the Special Reserve.

16. Share Issue Expenses

Share issue expenses are charged to the Share Premium Account.

* a. Includes Rs1,000 crores of bonds raised by erstwhile State Bank of

Indore (SBIN) merged with SBI on 26th August 2010.

b. Includes Rs6,497 crores raised vide Public Issue of Bonds in October 2010 and February 2011 ** Includes Rs165 crores of Bonds raised by erstwhile State Bank of Indore (e SBIN) merged with SBI on 26th August 2010.

# Includes Rs2,000 crores raised during the F.Y. 2009-10, of which Rs550 crores invested by SBI Employee Pension Fund, not reckoned for the purpose of Tier I Capital as per RBI instructions.


Mar 31, 2010

A. Basis of Preparation

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention as modified for derivatives and foreign currency transactions, as enumerated in Part C below. They conform to Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) in India, which comprise the statutory provisions, guidelines of regulatory authorities, Reserve Bank of India (RBI), accounting standards/guidance notes issued by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India (ICAI), and the practices prevalent in the banking industry in India.

B. Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements requires the management to make estimates and assumptions considered in the reported amounts of assets and liabilities (including contingent liabilities) as of the date of the. financial statements and the reported income and expenses during the reporting period. Management believes that the estimates used in the preparation of the financial statements are prudent and reasonable. Future results could differ from these estimates. Any revision to the accounting estimates is recognised prospectively in the current and future periods.

C. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES 1. Revenue recognition

1.1 Income and expenditure are accounted on accrual basis, except otherwise stated below. In respect of banks foreign offices, income is recognised as per the local laws of the country in which the respective foreign office is located.

1.2 Interest income is recognised in the Profit and Loss Account as it accrues except (i) income from non- performing assets (NPAs), comprising .of advances, leases and investments, which is recognised upon realisation, as per the prudential norms prescribed by the RBI/ respective country regulators (hereafter collectively referred to as Regulatory Authorities), (ii) interest on application money on investments (iii) overdue interest on investments and bills discounted, (iv) Income on Rupee Derivatives designated as "Trading"

1.3 Profit or-loss on sale of investments is credited / debited to Profit and Loss Account (Sale of Investments). Profit on sale of investments in the Held to Maturity category shall be appropriated net of applicable taxes to Capital Reserve Account. Loss on sale will be recognized in the Profit and Loss Account.

1.4 Income from finance leases is calculated by applying the interest rate implicit in the lease to the net investment outstanding on the lease, over the primary lease period. Leases effective from April 1, 2001 are accounted as advances at an amount equal to the net investment in the lease. The lease rentals are apportioned between principal and finance income based on a pattern reflecting a constant periodic return on the net investment outstanding in respect of finance leases. The principal amount is utilized for reduction in balance of net investment in lease and finance income is reported-as interest income.

1.5 Income (other than interest) on investments in "Held to Maturity" (HTM) category acquired at a discount to the face value, is recognised as follows :

a) On Interest bearing securities, it is recognised only at the time of sale/ redemption.

b) On zero-coupon securities, it is accounted for over the balance tenor of the security on a constant yield basis.

1.6 Dividend is accounted on an accrual basis where the right to receive the dividend is established.

1.7 All other commission and fee incomes are recognised on their realisation except for (i) Guarantee commission on deferred payment guarantees, which is spread over the period of the guarantee and (ii) Commission on Government Business, which is recognised as it accrues.

1.8 One time Insurance Premium paid under Special Home Loan Scheme (December 2008 to June 2009) is amortised over average loan period of 15 years.

2. Investments

Investments are accounted for in accordance with the extant regulatory guidelines. The bank follows trade date method for accounting of its investments.

2.1 Classification

Investments are classified into 3 categories, viz. Held to Maturity, Available for Sale and Held for Trading categories (hereafter called categories). Under each of these categories, investments are further classified into the following six groups:

i. Government Securities,

ii. Other Approved Securities,

iii. Shares,

iv. Debentures and Bonds,

v. Subsidiaries/Joint ventures and

vi. Others.

2.2 Basis of classification

i. Investments that the Bank intends to hold till maturity are classified as Held to Maturity.

ii. Investments that are held principally for resale within 90 days from the date of purchase are classified as Held for Trading.

iii. Investments, which are not classified in the above two categories, are classified as Available for Sale.

iv. An investment is classified as Held to Maturity, Available for Sale or Held for Trading at the time of its purchase and subsequent shifting amongst categories is done in conformity with regulatory guidelines.

v. Investments in subsidiaries, joint ventures and associates are classified under Held to Maturity.

2.3 Valuation

i. In determining the acquisition cost of an investment:

(a) Brokerage/commission received on subscriptions is reduced from the cost.

(b) Brokerage, commission, securities transaction tax etc. paid in connection with acquisition of investments are expensed upfront and excluded from cost.

(c) Broken period interest paid / received on debt instruments is treated as interest expense/income and is excluded from cost/sale consideration.

(d) Cost is determined on the weighted average cost method.

(e) The transfer of a security amongst the above three categories is accounted for at the least of acquisition cost/book value/market value on the date of transfer, and the depreciation, if any, on such transfer is fully provided for.

ii. Treasury Bills and Commercial Papers are valued at carrying cost.

iii. Held to Maturity category: Each scrip under Held to Maturity category is carried at its acquisition cost or at amortised cost, if acquired at a premium over the face value. Any premium on acquisition is amortised over the remaining maturity period of the security on constant yield basis. Such amortisation of premium is adjusted against income under the head "interest on investments". A provision is made for diminution, other than temporary. Investments in subsidiaries, joint ventures and associates (both in India and abroad) are valued at historical cost except for investments in Regional Rural Banks, which are valued at carrying cost (i.e book value).

iv. Available for Sale and Held for Trading categories:

Each scrip in the above two categories is revalued at the market price or fair value determined as per Regulatory guidelines, and only the net depreciation of each group for each category is provided for and net appreciation, is ignored. On provision for depreciation, the book value of the individual securities remains unchanged after marking to market.

v. Security receipts issued by an asset reconstruction company (ARC) are valued in accordance with the guidelines applicable to non-SLR instruments. Accordingly, in cases where the security receipts issued by the ARC are limited to the actual realisation of the financial assets assigned to the instruments in the concerned scheme, the Net Asset Value, obtained from the ARC, is reckoned for valuation of such investments.

vi. Investments are classified as performing and non- performing, based on the guidelines issued by the RBI in case of domestic offices and respective regulators in case of foreign offices. Investments of domestic offices become non performing where:

(a) Interest/installment (including maturity proceeds) is due and remains unpaid for more than 90 days.

(b) In the case of equity shares, in the event the investment in the shares of any company is valued at Re. 1 per company on account of the non availability of the latest balance sheet, those equity shares would be reckoned as NPI.

(c) If any credit facility availed by the issuer is NPA in the books of the bank, investment in any of the securities issued by the same issuer would also be treated as NPI and vice versa.

(d) The above would apply mutatis-mutandis to preference shares where the fixed dividend is not paid.

(e) The .investments in debentures/bonds, which are deemed to be in the nature of advance, are also subjected to NPI norms as applicable to investments.

(f) In respect of foreign offices, provisions for non performing investments are made as per the local regulations or as per the norms of RBI, whichever is higher.

vii. The Bank has adopted the Uniform Accounting Procedure prescribed by the RBI for accounting of Repo and Reverse Repo transactions [other than transactions Under the Liquidity Adjustment Facility (LAF) with the RBI]. Accordingly, the securities sold/purchased under Repo/Reverse repo are treated as outright sales/purchases and accounted for in the Repo/Reverse Repo Accounts, and the entries are reversed on the date of maturity. Costs and revenues are accounted as interest expenditure/income, as , the case may be. Balance in Repo/Reverse Repo Account is adjusted against the balance in the Investment Account.

viii. Securities purchased / sold under LAF with RBI are debited / credited to Investment Account and reversed on maturity of the transaction. Interest expended / earned thereon is accounted for as expenditure / revenue.

3. . Loans /Advances and Provisions thereon

3.1 Loans and Advances are classified as performing and non-performing, based on the guidelines issued by the RBI. Loan assets become non-performing where:

i. In respect of term loan, interest and/or instalment of principal remains overdue for a period of more than 90 days;

ii. In respect of an Overdraft or Cash Credit advance, the account remains "out of order", i.e. if the outstanding balance exceeds the sanctioned limit/ drawing power continuously for a period of 90 days, or if there are no credits continuously for 90 days as on the date of balance-sheet, or if the credits are not adequate to cover the interest due during the same period;

iii. In respect of bills purchased/discounted, the bill remains overdue for a period of more than 90 days;

iv. In respect of agricultural advances for short duration crops, where the instalment of principal or interest remains overdue for 2 crop seasons;

v. In respect of agricultural advances for long duration crops, where the principal or interest remains overdue for one crop season.

3.2 Non-Performing advances are classified into sub- standard, doubtful and loss assets, based on the following criteria stipulated by RBI:

i. Sub-standard: A loan asset that has remained non-performing for a period less than or equal to 12 months.

ii. Doubtful: A loan asset that has remained in the sub-standard category for a period of 12 months.

iii. Loss: A loan asset where loss has been identified but the amount has not been fully written off.

3-4 ,In respect of foreign offices, provisions for non performing advances are made as per the local regulations or as per the norms of RBI, whichever is higher.

3.5 The Sale of NPAs is accounted as per guidelines prescribed by the RBI, which requires provisions to

- .be made for any-deficit (where sale price is lower than the net book value), while surplus (where sale price is higher than the net book value) is ignored. Net book Value is outstandings as reduced by specific provisions held and ECGC. claims received.

3.6 Advances are net of specific .loan loss provisions, unrealised interest, ECGC claims received and bills redisCounted.

3.7 For restructured/rescheduled assets, provisions are made in accordance with the guidelines issued by RBI, which requires that the present value of future interest due as per the. original loan agreement, compared with the present value of the interest expected to be earned under the restructuring package, be provided in addition to provision for NPAs. The provision for interest sacrifice, arising put of the above, is reduced from advances.

3.8 In the Gase of loan accounts classified as NPAs, an account may be reclassified as a performing account if it conforms to the guidelines prescribed by the regulators.

3.9 Amounts recovered against debts written t>ff in earlier ¦ years, arerecognised as revenue,.

3.10 Unrealised Interest recognised in the previous year on advances which have become non-performing during the current year, is provided for.

3.11 In addition to the specific provision on NPAs, general provisions are also made for standard assets as per the extant guidelines prescribed by the RBI. The provisions on standard assets are not reckoned for arriving at net NPAs. These provisions are reflected in Schedule 5 of thebalance sheet under the head "Other Liabilities & Provisions - Others."

4. Floating Provisions

In accordance with the Reserve* Bank of India guidelines, (he-bank has an approved policy for creation.and utilisation of floating provisions separately for advances, investments and general purpose. The quantum of floating provisions to be created would be assessed, at, the end of each financial year. The floating provisions would be utilised only for contingencies under extra ordinary circumstances specified in the policy with prior permission of Reserve Bank of India.

5. Provision for Country Exposure

In addition to the specific provisions held according to the asset classification status, provisions are held for individual country exposures (other than the home country). Countries are categorised into seven risk categories, namely, insignificant, low, moderate, high, very high, restricted and off-credit, and provisioning made as - per extant RBI guidelines. If the country exposure Inet) Of the bank in respect of each country does not exceed 1% of the total funded assets, no provision is maintained on such country, exposures. The provision is reflected in schedule 5 of the balance sheet under the "Other liabilities & Provisions - Others".

6. Derivatives

6.1 The Bank enters into derivative contracts, such as , ; foreign currency options, interest rate swaps, currency swaps, and cross currency interest rate swaps and forward rate agreements in order to hedge on-balance sheet/ off-balance sheet assets and liabilities or for trading purposes. The swap contracts: entered to hedge on-balance sheet assets and liabilities are structured in such a way that they bear an opposite and offsetting "¦ impact with; the underlying on-balance sheet items. The impact of such derivative instruments is correlated with the. movement of the underlying assets and accounted in accordance with the principles of hedge accounting.

6.2 Derivative contracts classified as hedge are recorded oil accrual basis. Hedge contracts are not marked to market unless the underlying Assets / Liabilities are also marked to .market.,

6.3 Except as mentioned above, all other derivative contracts are marked to market as per the generally accepted practices prevalent in the industry. In respect of derivative contracts that are marked to market, changes in the market value are recognised in the profit and loss account in the period of change. Any receivable under derivatives contracts, which remain overdue for more than 90 days, are reversed through profit and loss account,

6.4 Option premium paid or received is recorded in profit and loss account at the expiry of the option. The Balance in the premium received on options sold and premium paid on options bought have been considered t& arrive at Mark to Market value for forex Over the Counter options,

6.5 ,Exchange Traded Foreign Exchange and Interest Rate Futures entered into for trading purposes are valued at prevailing market rates based on quoted and observable market prices and the resultant gains and tosses are,recognized in the Profit and Loss Account.

7. Fixed Assets and Depreciation

7.1 Fixed assets are carried at cost less accumulated depreciation.

7.2 Cost-- inchides cost of purchase and all expenditure such as -site preparation, installation costs and professional fees incurred on the asset before it is put to use. Subsequent expenditure incurred on assets put to use is capitalised only when it increases the future benefits from such assets or their functioning capability.

7.4 In respect of assets acquired for domestic operations during the year, depreciation is charged for half an year in respect of assets used for upto 182 days and for the full year in respect of assets used for more than 182 days, except depreciation on computers, ATM and software, which is charged for the full year irrespective of the period for which the asset was put to use.

7.5 Items costing less than Rs. 1,000 each are charged off in the year of purchase.

7.6 In respect of leasehold premises, the lease premium, if any, is amortised over the period of lease and the lease rent is charged in the respective year.

7.7 In respect of assets given on lease by the Bank on or before 311" March 2001, the value of the assets given on lease is disclosed as Leased Assets under fixed assets, and the difference between the annual lease charge (capital recovery) and the depreciation is taken to Lease Equalisation Account.

7.8 In respect of fixed assets held at foreign offices, depreciation is provided as per the regulations /norms of the respective countries.

8. Leases

The asset classification and provisioning norms applicable to advances, as laid down in Para 3 above, are applied to financial leases also.

9. Impairment of Assets

Fixed Assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances warrant that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Recoverability of assets to be held and used is measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset to future net discounted cash flows expected to be generated by the asset. If such assets are considered to be impaired, the impairment to be recognised is measured by the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the fair value of the asset.

10. Effect of changes in the foreign exchange rate

10.1 Foreign Currency Transactions

i. Foreign currency transactions are recorded on initial recognition in the reporting currency by applying to the foreign currency amount the exchange rate between the reporting currency and the foreign currency on the date of transaction.

ii. Foreign currency monetary items are reported using the Foreign Exchange Dealers Association of India (FEDAI) closing spot/forward rates.

iii. Foreign currency non-monetary items, which are carried in terms at historical cost, are reported using the exchange rate at the date of the transaction.

iv. Contingent liabilities denominated in foreign currency are reported using the FEDAI closing spot rates.

v. Outstanding foreign exchange spot and forward contracts held for trading are revalued at the exchange rates notified by FEDAI for specified maturities, and the resulting profit or loss is included in the Profit and Loss account.

vi. Foreign exchange forward contracts which are not intended for trading and are outstanding at the balance sheet date, are valued at the closing spot rate. The premium or discount arising at the inception of such a forward exchange contract is amortised as expense or income over the life of the contract.

vii. Exchange differences arising on the settlement of monetary items at rates different from those at which they were initially recorded are recognised as income or as expense in the period in which they arise.

viii. Gains / Losses on account of changes in exchange rates of open position in currency futures trades are settled with the exchange clearing house on daily basis and such gains / losses are recognised in the profit and loss account.

10.2 Foreign Operations

Foreign Branches of the Bank and Offshore Banking Units have been classified as Non-integral Operations and Representative Offices have been classified as Integral Operations.

a. Non-integral Operations

i. Both monetary and non-monetary foreign currency assets and liabilities including contingent liabilities of non-integral foreign operations, are translated at closing exchange rates notified by FEDAI at the balance sheet date.

ii. Income and expenditure of non-integral foreign operations ace translated at quarterly average closing rates.

iii. Exchange differences arising on net investment in non-integral foreign operations are . accumulated in Foreign Currency Translation Reserve until the disposal of the net investment.

iv. The Assets and Liabilities of foreign offices in foreign currency (other than local currency of the foreign offices) are translated into local currency using spot rates applicable to that country.

b. Integral Operations

i. Foreign currency transactions are recorded on initial recognition in the reporting currency by applying to the foreign currency amount the exchange rate between the reporting currency and the foreign currency on the date of transaction.

ii. Monetary foreign currency assets and liabilities of integral foreign operations are translated at closing exchange rates notified by FEDAI at the balance sheet date and the resulting profit/ loss is included in the profit and loss account.

iii. Foreign currency non-monetary items which are carried in terms of historical cost are reported using the exchange rate at the date of the transaction.

11. Employee Benefits

11.1 Short Term Employee Benefits

The undiscounted amount of short-term employee benefits, such as medical benefits, casual leave etc. which are expected to be paid in exchange for the services rendered by employees are recognised during the period when the employee renders the service.

11.2 Post Employment Benefits

i. Defined Benefit Plan

a. The Bank operates a Provident Fund scheme. All eligible employees are entitled to receive benefits under the Banks Provident Fund scheme. The Bank contributes monthly at a determined rate (currently 10% of employees basic pay plus eligible allowance). These contributions are remitted to a trust established for this purpose and are charged to Profit and Loss Account. The trust funds are retained as deposits in the bank. The bank is liable for annual contributions and interest on deposits held by the bank, which is payable at Government specified minimum rate of interest on provident fund balances of Government Employees. The bank recognises such annual contributions and interest as an expense in the year to which they relate.

b. The bank operates gratuity and pension schemes which are defined benefit plans.

c. The Bank provides for gratuity to all eligible employees. The benefit is in the form of lump sum payments to vested employees on retirement, on death while in employment, or on termination of employment, for an amount equivalent to 15 days basic salary payable for each completed year of service, subject to a maximum amount of Rs. 350,000. Vesting occurs upon completion of five years of service. The Bank makes annual contributions to a fund administered by trustees based on an independent external actuarial valuation carried out annually.

d. The Bank provides for pension to all eligible employees. The benefit is in the form of monthly payments as per rules and regular payments to vested employees on retirement, on death while in employment, or on termination of employment. Vesting occurs at different stages as per rules. The pension liability is reckoned based on an independent actuarial valuation carried out annually. The Bank makes annual contribution to the pension fund at 10% of salary in terms of SBI Pension Fund Rules. The balance is retained in the special provision account to be utilised at the time of settlement.

e. The cost of providing defined benefits is determined using the projected unit credit method, with actuarial valuations being carried out at each balance sheet date. Actuarial gains/losses are immediately recognised in the statement of profit and loss and are not deferred.

ii. Other Long Term Employee benefits

a. All eligible employees of the bank are eligible for compensated absences, silver jubilee award, leave travel concession, retirement award and resettlement allowance. The costs of such long term employee benefits are internally funded by the Bank.

b. The cost of providing other long term benefits is determined using the projected unit credit method with actuarial valuations being carried out at each balance sheet date. Past service cost is immediately recognised in the statement of profit and loss and is not deferred.

12. Provision for Taxation

12.1 Income tax expense is the aggregate amount of current tax and deferred tax. Current year taxes are determined in accordance with the provisions of Accounting Standard 22 and tax laws prevailing in India after taking into account taxes of foreign offices, which are based on the tax laws of respective jurisdiction. Deferred tax adjustments comprise of changes in the deferred tax assets or liabilities during the period.

12.2 Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using tax rates and tax laws that have been enacted or substantially enacted prior to the balance sheet date. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognised on a prudent basis for the future tax consequences of timing differences arising between the carrying values of assets and liabilities and their respective tax basis, and carry forward losses. The impact of changes in the deferred tax assets and liabilities is recognised in the profit and loss account,

12.3 Deferred tax assets are recognised and reassessed at each reporting date, based upon managements judgement as to whether realisation is considered certain. Deferred tax assets are recognised on carry forward of unabsorbed depreciation and tax losses only if there is virtual certainty that such deferred tax assets can be realised against future profits.

13. Earning per Share

13.1 The Bank reports basic and diluted earnings per share in accordance with AS 20 -Earnings per Share issued by the ICAI. Basic earnings per share are computed by dividing the net profit after tax by the weighted average number of equity shares outstanding for the year.

13.2 Diluted earnings per share reflect the potential dilution that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue equity shares were exercised or converted during the year. Diluted earnings per share are computed using the weighted average number of equity shares and dilutive potential equity shares outstanding at year end.

14. Accounting for Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets

14.1 In conformity with AS 29, "Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets", issued by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of India, the Bank recognises provisions only when it has a present obligation as a result of a past event, it is probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation, and when a reliable estimate of the amount of the obligation can be made.

14.2 No provision is recognised for

i. any possible obligation that arises from past events and the existence of which will be confirmed only by the occurrence or non-occurrence of one or more uncertain future events not wholly within the control of the Bank; or

ii. any present obligation that arises from past events but is not recognised because

a. it is not probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation; or

b. a reliable estimate of the amount of obligation cannot be made.

Such obligations are recorded as Contingent Liabilities. These are assessed at regular intervals and only that part of the obligation for which an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits is probable, is provided for, except in the extremely rare circumstances where no reliable estimate can be made.

14.3 Contingent Assets are not recognised in the financial statements as this may result in the recognition of income that may never be realised.

15. Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand and in ATMs, and gold in hand, balances with RBI, balances with other banks, and money at call and short notice.

16. Employee Share Purchase Scheme

In accordance with the Employee Stock Option Scheme and Employee Stock Purchase Scheme Guidelines, 1999 issued by the Securities and Exchange Board of India ("SEBI"), the excess of market price one day prior to the date of issue of the shares over the price at which they are issued is recognised as employee compensation cost.

17. Share Issue Expenses

Share issue expenses are charged to the Share Premium Account.

 
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